Fall Prevention & Sports Safety

Several factors contribute to childhood falls:  in warm-weather months, children spend more time on playgrounds, sports fields, balconies, fire escapes and near open windows.  In homes, toddlers and young children are at risk from falls on stairs.  Older children tend to suffer from falls associated with playground equipment and sports.

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Falls are the leading cause of injury hospitalizations for Oregon children from birth to 19 years of age.  Between 2012-2014, 10 children ages 0 – 19 years in Oregon died and a whopping 1,252 were hospitalized due to injuries sustained in falls.

 

Safe Kids Worldwide Tip Sheets

Fall Prevention Tip Sheet  English

Sports Safety Tip Sheet English

Sports Safety Tip Sheet Spanish

Sports Safety Check Sheet for Parents English

Sports Safety Check Sheet for Coaches English

Sports Safety Check Sheet for Kids English

Concussion Guide for Coaches English

Concussion Guide for Parents English

Concussion Guide for Parents Spanish

Dehydration Tips Sheet for Parents English

Dehydration Tip Sheet for Parents Spanish

Sports Over Use Injury Tip Sheet English

Sports Over Use Injury Tip Sheet Spanish

 

Resources

Safe Kids Worldwide Sports Safety web page

Safe Kids Worldwide Falls Prevention web page

Legacy Safety Store – resources to prevent window and other falls in the home

Doernbecher Tom Sargent Safety Center – resources to prevent window and other falls in the home

Stop at 4 – information and links to resources to prevent window falls

WIndow Safety

Oregon Concussion Awareness and Management Program (OCAMP)

Oregon Concussion Law Implementation Guide for School Districts and Youth Sports Organization

This on-line guide is designed to help school administrators and non-school youth sports organization directors implement policies and procedures to comply with laws intended to protect youth in organized athletic events.

 

Oregon Law – Max’s and Jenna’s Laws

Max’s Law (2010) applies to Oregon School Districts.
Jenna’s Law (2014) extends the intent of Max’s Law to Oregon youth sports and referee organizations.

Both Max’s and Jenna’s Laws require school and non-school youth athletic programs to:

  • Create policies and procedures
  • Provide training
  • Track training
  • Ensure that staff practice good concussion management
  • Restrict play when a concussion is suspected
  • Provide educational materials/programs

 

Max’s Law (OAR 581-022-0421) was enacted in 2010 and requires Oregon school districts to implement concussion management guidelines for student athletes.

 

Jenna’s Law (SB 721) was enacted in 2014 and requires Oregon Non-School Sports and Officiating Organizations to implement concussion management guidelines for all teams that include children 17 years of age and younger.

 

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